Preschool Aged Children

Educational Road Trip Games and Activities for Preschool Aged Children

Long car trips with preschool age children are a challenge for both the kids and the parents alike. Make your car time with the family more enjoyable and educational this season with these travel games and activities for preschool aged children.

Play I Spy Say to your child, “I spy with my little eye something blue,” and let your child guess what you are saying. If she spies anything blue-a car, a billboard, the sky-she “wins” and gets to say the next I spy riddle. (Vocabulary and observation skills)

Pack a Trip Bag Load up a backpack or canvas bag with some of your child’s favorite toys that can be played while sitting: white boards and markers, small toys, Silly Putty, travel games, coloring books, etc… Include a few new games and toys, especially ones related to travel such as toy cameras, toy binoculars, journals and toy cell phones. (Creativity, role play, small motor skills)

Make a Map Take a hint from Dora the Explorer and make a simple map of where you are going and some of the landmarks you will be passing. Use simple drawings as icons of what you will be passing: forests, cities, bridges, mountains, lakes, rivers, and towns. Every so often take out the map and show how far you’ve gone. (Visual skills, map skills)

Pack a Sing Along Tape Preschoolers love to sing and they love when their parents sing with them, too. They also don’t care if you sing off key. (Vocabulary skills)

Play Travel Bingo Draw or find clip art pictures of items that you commonly see on the road and make a few bingo cards with nine pictures (three across and three down) or sixteen pictures (four across and four down). Make sure the pictures are items that you commonly see on a road trip, such as stoplights, RVs, Exit signs, airplanes and so on. Let your child look for the items on the card until he gets Bingo. (Observation skills)

Silly Sounds Make up sound effects to go with the things you see on the road. Say “moo, moo” every time you see a cow, “beep, beep” when you see a bus, “splish, splash” when you cross a river, and “vroom, vroom” when you pass a convertible. Your child will be giggling all the way to you destination. (Oral language skills)

Counting Signs Give your child a piece of paper and a pencil. Ask her to keep track of how many items she sees in two minutes, such as stop signs, cows, big trucks, and other common items. Show her how to make an X on her paper every time she sees the item. At the end of two minutes, say “stop” and count the Xes. (Math and small motor skills)

Group Drawings Give your child a piece of paper and crayons and let him draw one thing on the picture, such as a person or a tree, and pass it to the next person. The next person adds something else to the picture, such as a sun or a house, and passes it on. Continue until the entire paper is full. (Creativity, small motor skills)

Cincinnati Bed and Breakfasts Treat Guests Like Royalty

Cincinnati Bed and Breakfasts Treat Guests Like Royalty

Bed and Breakfasts put out the red carpet treatment to their guests in Cincinnati, Ohio. Located in Southwest Ohio, Cincinnati is a busy city with a thriving tourism industry that draws in millions of travelers every year. The largest Labor Day fireworks show in the United States as well as the second largest Oktoberfest in the world bring in half a million people alone. It is easy to get lost in the shuffle in this busy city, but for a little royal treatment in the Queen city why not try a locally owned bed and breakfast. Individual treatment with a focus on customer services and quality above quantity are traits along the local bread and breakfasts.

The Grace and Glory Bed and Breakfast, located at 3539 Shaw Avenue in Cincinnati, Ohio offers its guests a refugee from the hustle and bustle of downtown Cincinnati. The Grace and Glory bed and breakfast is a beautiful restored Colonial style home, where the focus is on hospitality, charm and comfort. It is 10 minutes north of Downtown Cincinnati and a short walk to local Hyde Park Square, a local gathering place surrounded by clothing shops, coffee shops, breweries, eateries, restaurants, and art galleries. A stay with at the B B; includes a complimentary breakfast and access to their charming parlor, solarium, and living room. Rooms are decorated with antiques and a great nights sleep can be found in one of their many four-poster beds. Guests are centrally located in Cincinnati, giving them easy access to local attractions such as the Cincinnati Zoo, the National Underground Railroad Museum, and the Cincinnati Art Museum.

The Wallace House Bed and Breakfast is just five minutes south of Downtown Cincinnati in Covington, Kentucky. A Queen Anne style mansion built in 1905 by Robert B. Wallace, a local landowner. Guests have free reign over their large billiard room and expansive front porch. Amenities include a large screen television as well as high-speed Internet access so you can keep in touch with others while you are traveling. Their web site, www.bbonline/ky/wallacehouse offers specials and the chance to make your reservations online. Ideally located within five minutes of Great American Ballpark, Paul Brown Stadium, and the Cincinnati business district on Walnut Street makes this a convenient place to stay for work or play. Take advantage of the local riverboats that travel up an down the Ohio River, stopping within minutes of the Wallace House Bed and breakfast.

The Clifton House Bed and Breakfast, at 500 Terrace Avenue, is located in Cincinnati’s college community near the University of Cincinnati, Xavier University, and Hebrew Union College. It is a convent location for parents to stay while visiting their children in college. TH Clifton House Bed and Breakfast is a Classic revival mansion that was built in 1900. Recent renovations have brought it up to date with modern conveniences. Guest will find a beautiful library, dining room, billiards, workout room, and living at their disposal. Breakfast as well as an afternoon stack is included with your stay. Nearby Newport Aquarium and kings Island offers parents and their departing college student fun activities while they visit. Ludlow business districts is steps away from the bed and breakfast and provides an array of shops, restraints, coffee shops, boutiques, bookstores, and Cincinnati’s oldest movie theater. Wine and cheese is offered on the large front porch in the afternoons. A quick search of their website www.cliftonhouse.com provides guests with a list of their specials as well as chance to register to win a free two night stay.

Nearby Gaslight Bed  amp; Breakfast also offers a great central Clifton location. The University of Cincinnati is only steps away as well as University and Good Samaritan Hospitals. Built in1909 Gaslight Bed and Breakfast has been restored to the modern day standards of many hotels. As you walk up the steps to the front t entrance you are greeted with a cascading waterfall, a sign of what is to come on the interior of this lovely bed and breakfast. Overstuffed furniture and floor to ceiling windows invite guests to relax while they read the paper and enjoy their breakfast. A second floor kitchen is convenient for guests to make snacks for themselves or for the avid foody to cook their own meal. This is also convenient for guests who will have an extended stay. Cable television, high speed internet access, private phone line, top of the line mattresses, and sheets make this an ideal place to stay for those of you who can not forgo the luxuries of a hotel. Each morning a full home-style breakfast is served to their guests. This luxurious four-story mansion provides peace, tranquility, and convenience in the thriving Clifton area.

Six Acres Bed and Breakfast is 6500 square foot mansion locate din in the College Hill neighborhood of Cincinnati. One of the oldest bed and breakfast in Cincinnati, it was built around 1850. Zebulon Strong, an abolitionist and local participant in the Underground Railroad built the home. Special guided tours lead guests on trails that run away slaves traveled to their freedom. History overflows at this beautifully restored home. Guests know they are only one of many travelers who have been through this spot. Rooms are named after staff member’s grandmothers. Amenities include massage therapy; turn down service, a full breakfast, and satellite television. Many activities are hosted by the bed and breakfast including quilting and cooking classes as well as other educational seminars. Each summer the Six Acres Bed and breakfast hosts a summer concert series. Guests and local relax in the beautifully landscape ground while they live to local artists perform. Guest are encouraged to bring their own seating and picnic dinners. Located only fifteen minutes north of downtown, wedding, retreats and work related seminars are commonly held at the Six Acres Bed and breakfast. A visit to their website www.sixacresbb.com provides information on specially priced packages as well as group rates. This beautiful tranquil setting provides a great place to relax in a natural setting.

Whether you are looking for an in town location or a tranquil natural landscape the Queen City’s bed and breakfast’s treat their guests like royalty.

American Entrepreneurs

 

Entrepreneurs have fascinated the American public for decades. Ford, John Deere, and many others not only have left their name sake on the companies that they started but also changed our nation. These early pioneers changed America and their names have become icons. The modern day “pioneer” we may never here the name of but we all can be affected to their contributions everyday. Many of the entrepreneurs are really intrapreneurs. They work for a company that is open to their input and suggestions.

What is an intrapreneur? Gifford Pinchot coined the phrase back in the 1980’s to explain current and past trends. He once stated “look back at any great business or invention at just about any big company and you can find that intrapreneurs created it.” (Takahashi 2001) An intrapreneur is someone at an existing company that has thee freedom to innovate and then push those ideas through the organization. They are given company resources to develop new ideas and concepts. Most companies do not practice intrapreneurship because it can be somewhat risky and not in line with existing management styles and expectations. But more and more companies are learning that this is a good way to do business and have taken advantage of the talent and ideas that are already in the company.

 

3M Intrapreneurship Bench Mark

 

3M was and still is one of these companies that are willing to take the risk of incorporating in house intrapreneurship. The founders of 3M hired others like themselves, innovators. They learned early to identify and utilize the talent that they have. An account of this from 1923 demonstrates this clearly.

 

Dick Drew identified a need in the auto industry for tape that would be used for painting two tone automobiles. He made an initial attempt to come up with a product on his own. It was too rigid to work properly and he knew it needed more work. (Fry 1987) When then CEO William McKnight caught wind of this he ordered Drew to stop. Dick Drew only followed those orders for one day and then began to work on that project again. Today we have masking tape and 3M has a policy that employees can use 15% their time in developing new ideas and products.

 

This early innovation and commitment to intrpreneurship is why I have made 3M to measure 3 other companies by in this paper. They have earned that distinction.

 

Through the programs that 3M has put into place they have had sustainable results. I will take the factors that made 3M successful and then compare and contrast them to the other companies.

 

Mr. Fry whose article that I’ve used as the basis for this paper is not only another employee at 3m but the innovator behind “post it notes”. He put the successful factors in his article and I will point out how these factors fit into helping him achieve post it notes through the stages of development.

 

Executive Champions. These are the upper managers who are not threatened by intrapreneurial activity but embrace it and encourage it through their support and seeing that those good ideas like post its get through.

 

Availability of resources. 3m has an 80/20 rule when it comes to resources for its developing intrapreneurial ventures. 80% of the materials used in these projects come from things already owned by the company and the other 20%come from outside sources. Fry called this scrounging and had to go out onto the shop floor to find some of the things that he needed to make this work.

 

Freedom to fail. During the process of developing an idea into a marketable product Fry was not discouraged or dissuaded from further pursuit of the idea. He was able to get some inside help and when the office staff of company executives fell in love with their new note pads eh began to get some help from upper management. I was impressed that when his project didn’t really look all that promising that he was allowed to continue. Management at 3M haws the foresight to look long term and knows that some ventures will be a success and some will fail.

 

Dual ladder policy: Just because you are a technical worker at 3M that doesn’t mean that pay and job titles have the expected ceiling like most other companies. At 3M you do not have to manage people to earn the highest rewards and job title associated with it.

 

Communications Network: they focus on exchanging ideas and helping each other on

 

key projects even in facilities that are around the world. (Fry 1987)

 

Intel Thinking Outside The Box

 

From the evidence in this article Intel does a good job encouraging employees to think outside the box and have the desire to want to let their ideas be known.

 

One example of Intel’s commitment to intrapreneurship is that of Paul Scagnetti. He came up with the idea of a hand held device that records and plans fitness and nutritional information. He acquired Intel’s financing and was given 15 employees to help launch his fitness planner.

 

Intel demonstrated that employees are given the resources and support to try new things and have the companies help and guidance. The executives championed new ideas, provided resources and made it acceptable to try and fail. (Takahashi 2000)

 

Microsoft

 

Microsoft’s game designer Seamus Blackley showed a true entrepreneurial trait when a major project he was working on failed in the marketplace. He failed, picked himself up, and tried again with a new idea. Blacklley thought that Microsoft should take the knowledge and experience in computers and use that to create a game player that could compete with Sony’s Playstation. (Takahashi 2000)

 

Through determination and despite some initial serious opposition he was able to get those important to the success of such a project behind it and was off and running.

 

In 2001 X-Box was released to enthusiastic gamers. I am sure that Blackley could not have envisioned the buzz that would accompany the release of the X-Box 360 in 2005.

 

Through this Microsoft demonstrated executive championing, access to resources, and a communication system that was key to the success of this project. (Takahashi 2000)

 

Alcoa

 

Has a different take on the intrapreneurial developments that other companies are using. To Alcoa, which is a specialty metal producer, processes are everything. If they can hone those processes and eliminate waste they have an advantage over their competition and earn more without increasing customer base. To achieve this we have a fairly formal way of getting together to discuss certain problems or challenges. These meetings are called Kaizens and involve employees at all levels. Problems are solved using a testing process and any conclusions that the group comes up with are monitored and changed as needed.

 

They may not be encouraging new businesses but they are empowering those who are closest to what is done on a daily basis to change how they do business. I believe that Alcoa definitely has executive champions for this new way of turning everyone into intellectual capital and that is throughout this organization of 120,000 employees. They provide a system for communication, resources and an environment for trial and failure.

 

Overcoming Competition

 

Overcoming competitors’ ability to duplicate the advantages you have created through intrapreneurial efforts was spelled out in the article “Innovation Through Intrapreneurship” by the one who literally coined the phrase intrapreneur, Gifford Pinchot. The author felt that companies should hold back on placing all of your improvements or newly acquired know-how into the marketplace at once. He suggested that keeping some important aspects to be applied to later versions of an individual product. This brings to mind the computers that had clock speeds in them that were just turned up in later versions to create faster operation. (Pinchot 1987)

 

I have learned from personal experience that some companies and especially manufactures are quite all right with being second rate when it comes to product development. They let their competitors pay the heavy bill for research and development and cut the path into new territory or technology. They are always right behind them benefiting from their hard work.

 

Conclusion

 

The companies that I used as examples have each have a unique approach to intrapreneurship. One of the major similarities in each organization is the expressed desire for their employees to be involved in such activities and not be threatened by that. This is something not common among most companies that leave product development and new business ideas up to those in charge who I believe are sometimes too busy managing to have the same sort of fresh perspective that others in the companies may have. The key to the success of any intrpreneurial venture in a company is the environment where those ideas will be considered and expressing those ideas is a good thing to do.

 

Bibliography

 

Pinchot, Gifford. (1987) “Innovation Through Intrapreneuring.” Research Management. March-April 1987. vol.xxx. no.2

 

Takahashi, Dean. (2000) “Reinventing the Intrapreneur: Corporations Are Devising New Ways to Cultivate Entrepreneurial Efforts”. Retrieved from Ebsco Host July 2006.

 

Fry, Art. (1987) “The Post-It Note: An Intrapreneurial Success.” This article was adapted from a speech given by Mr. Fry at the 1987 SAM Conference in Lancaster, Pa, May 2, 1987.

Best Blogs for Entrepreneurs

Blogging as a whole has become a very popular venue. Just as with the world wide web, business blogs have exploded with so much information that it would not be feasible to attempt to read it all. The key is to facilitate a means by which to attain the information you need, while sifting out the information you do not need. Below is a list that has been formulated for entrepreneurs.

Some of the blogs have been discontinued, or their activity levels have substantially dropped. It is for this reason that they have been moved and new blogs have been listed to take their place. Please keep this in mind as you try to access any of these blogs online.

 

There are primarily three main concerns of the entrepreneur. The first is trends and how to deal with their impact on business. Tips to make the business stronger, establish a business, or market the business. Productivity would be number three. Ways to make the employees and staff more productive, means by which to enhance the effectiveness of your marketing strategy, and overall productivity in sales and fabrication.

 

In terms of trends, there are a few good blogs out there. Anita Campbell on small business.blogspot.com/ takes an informative look at the present trends in the business world. She elucidates the entrepreneur of the trends that impact the business’ ability to enhance productivity and sales. Jeff Cornwall, of Belmont University does an in depth look at business trends and their impact on the small business. His research can be found at forum. Belmont.edu/cornwall/.

 

The entrepreneur can always use valuable tips from veteran business owners to improve their business. Denise O’Berry runs an informative blog that deals with tips for the entrepreneur. She keeps the discussions light and informative. (http://www.justforsmallbusiness.com). John Jantsch’s blog, duct tape marketing offers multiple tips per week. He keeps the terminology simple, and easy for even the layman to understand. A must read for those who are new to business. (http://www.ducttapemarketing.com).

 

Finally, in terms of valuable tips for the entrepreneur, Ben Yoskovitz delves in depth with the spirit of business ownership, and the factors that aid the entrepreneur in formulating a successful business. His site; startupspark.com also spotlights some entrepreneurs of notable mention.

 

Productivity is the pinacle issue for many small business owners. After all, if your marketing plan isn’t working, and your employees do not have the motivation to perform their tasks efficiently and in a timely manner, then how will the business flourish? That is what the final set of blogs deal with. WorkHappy net deals with just this. How to make the tasks you perform more productive, and how to get more out of your work. Carson McComas has developed methods to aid the entrepreneur to perform more intelligently, not to perform yourself to death.

 

Anthony Cerminaro is an attorney who has also dedicated his time to the functionings of business. His blog, bingbangbuzz.blogspot.com/ looks at the many issues and challenges that confront entrepreneurs everyday. He also explains the legal issue that can destroy a business. Dane Carlson takes this one step farther and relates the advice to actual real life circumstances. He offers insight into business opportunities as well. (http://www.business-opportunities.biz/)

 

Wil Schroter runs a blog called Gobi network.com/wil. It is on this site that aid is offered to entrepreneurs through the means of networking. He gives contacts to investors, investors, employee agencies and the such to enhance the growth of small businesses. Michael Simmons also deserves a definite read. He wrote the Student Success Manifesto. This is a thoughtful piece of work which offers solid advice for the soon to be entrepreneur. It is a new blog, but the insight and thought put into it leaves the readers vying for more.